Jesse McCartney 360 Reality Audio first listen

We talked to Jesse McCartney about the thrill of performing live, his first experience of 360 Reality Audio, and saying yes to great ideas.

In collaboration with LIVE NATION

Jesse McCartney

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Born in New York City, Jesse McCartney has built a career as a musical performer, songwriter, and actor of many stripes. At 11 years old, he received 2 Daytime Emmy nominations as a regular on ABC’s “All My Children,” while simultaneously a member of pop band Dream Street, whose debut album ended up selling over 800,000 copies.
By age 16, McCartney released his first solo album Beautiful Soul which sold over 1.8 million copies. In 2008, he co-wrote Leona Lewis' smash hit "Bleeding Love" with Ryan Tedder which hit #1 in 34 countries – the only song in over a decade to achieve this. The song was Grammy-nominated and won ASCAP's Song of the Year (2009). Jesse's single “Leavin’” from third album, Departure, was #1 Most Played on Top 40 radio in 2008 in US. Additional charting hits in his catalog include “She’s No You,” “Body Language,” “How Do You Sleep,” “It’s Over” & “Shake.” His acting roles have included leading roles in shows and films like ”Summerland” and “Keith” and memorable guest spots in “Hannah Montana” and “Fear The Walking Dead.” McCartney has voiced classic characters such as Theodore in all of the Alvin and The Chipmunks films, and currently plays Marvel’s superhero Nightwing in Young Justice 3.
In 2018, his single “Better With You” launched a sold out tour of the same name.  2019 began with the US leg of ‘The Resolution Tour’ and will bring Jesse to Southeast Asia for the first time. He is currently writing new music to be released in late 2019.

“Music is my first love”

- LIVE NATION

Thanks for sitting with us Jesse. You started your career at a very young age. What that was like for you, and what impact does it have on you as a performer today?

JESSE MCCARTNEY

Well, I grew up in a very musically inclined household—all of my family from my grandparents to my parents, my brother, my sister, my cousins. Everybody just grew up loving the arts, loving music, especially theatre. And I grew up with parents who encouraged us to get around the piano and sing together, listen to old albums together. That was my foundation.

I think I was seven or eight years old when I would go to the theatre with my parents, and watch them perform in local community productions of things like Rogers and Hammerstein productions. Eventually, I joined in with them. And we would perform together as a family in like 500-seat Victorian-style theatres.

It snowballed into this thing where a couple of people from the New York City came up to the suburbs and were like, hey, your kid is pretty good. Like maybe you should bring him down to Manhattan, see what happens. And eventually my mother brought me down and I started auditioning for Broadway. About a year in, maybe less, I booked my first gig as Louis in “The King and I” with Haley Mills playing Anna.

And at nine years old I was on my first national tour of “The King and I.” At the time, it didn't really seem like a job. It still doesn’t seem like a job. You know, I was getting paid, but I did it for the love of it. I wasn't really thinking about the business side of it at all. And then, you know, 20 years later here we are—I'm still doing it. And I still do it because I love it. There's slightly more of a business mind now involved with it. [Laughs] But it is and I think always will be my first love.

- LIVE NATION

How has all that experience when you were young led to you being a songwriter? And how do you feel now about the experience that you've had throughout your career when you think about songwriting?  

JESSE MCCARTNEY

I've always wanted to be a songwriter. I think at 16, you know, I thought I was going to be a great songwriter. And it's very rare that you can be, just because you have very little perspective at that point in your life. I was like this pubescent high school kid dealing with the struggles of any adolescent, and there's just only so much you know of the world.

I think it just took time for me to grow, and for me to travel and for me to meet new people and fall in—and out—of love, to experience pain and heartache and romance, all of the things that you need to draw from when you're writing a song.[At this point], more than ever, I feel a sense of mastery when it comes to songwriting, just because I feel like more than ever [before], I'm in my prime: I've travelled the world. I've soaked up many cultures around the world. And I've been in and out of relationships. I just have more wisdom, I guess you could say. [Laughs] And I think it just makes for better, more honest songwriting, more accessible songwriting.

- LIVE NATION

How much does making music mean to you today?

JESSE MCCARTNEY

Music, like I said, is my first love. And after taking a little bit of a hiatus—you know, I'd taken three-and-a-half, four years off to do other things to try my hand at other creative outlets—I think my last experience in the studio about a year ago, when I started this new collection of songs, I realized I've gotten a little better at it. You know, when I look back at 16-year-old me and I listen to some of the records I wrote—I understand why the record company was like, hmm, we're not going to put that on your album.

I think there's been this arc, and I feel like I’m still getting better. But I feel like this last collection of records has shown what I can do as a lyrist and as a songwriter. And I love what I do.

One of my favourite parts now is being able to write something and put it out immediately, and get an initial reaction—within a matter of minutes—from a group of people who have been following me over the years. Which wasn't so easy, once upon a time. It used to take months to figure out what the overall consensus was on a particular song.

- LIVE NATION

We want to get more into to that, the feedback, but first—is making music something you couldn't live without?

JESSE MCCARTNEY

Absolutely. Music is, you know, it sounds cliché, but it’s true—music is the universal language. I can go to Japan, and I don't speak a lick of Japanese, but I know when I play a song, I can see on their faces how it makes people feel. And there's this energy that happens on stage in the middle of a performance where you don't need to understand each other—but you still understand each other.

I couldn't imagine waking up and not putting on Spotify while I'm having my coffee. In the car, I'm listening—it’s part of my everyday life. And I think it is for most people.

- LIVE NATION

How much does performing live in front of thousands of fans mean to you?

JESSE MCCARTNEY

Well, performing live is where I'm most comfortable. I started on the stage, and theatre was where I was [first] thrown into the gauntlet. So, I'm very comfortable being on stage. And what's really great about [performing live] is that you have the ability to see the reaction to a song first-hand, and that's what I've been doing more and more. I'll write a song and I’ll play it at a college show or on one of my tours, and it’s a song that no one's ever heard, that hasn't been released. And you get that immediate reaction. And you can feel immediately if someone loves something or if they're not feeling it at all. That's my favourite part of performing.

And I love playing the songs that they all know. Playing the hits is something that never gets old, when everyone sings along. It's an indescribable feeling. But yeah, I love the testing of new material on stage right now. That's like my new thing. Where I can write something, jump on stage, and see if they're digging it.

- LIVE NATION

How important are your fans to you?

JESSE MCCARTNEY

I'm very fortunate that in this day and age where a lot of people are quick to move on to the next thing, my core fan base has really stayed loyal over the years in a way that, I think, doesn't quite align with the times. It's remarkable to me.

I think [my fans] really showed their true colours particularly over the last year and a half. I had taken that break away from music for a long period of time, and I was very apprehensive about putting anything out. 'Cause I didn't know what the reaction was going to be—I didn't know if people would even care. And they just, they showed up in record numbers. We've had two sold out tours this year. It was really a testament to how loyal my fans truly are.

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“Sony's vision, their core philosophy as a company, is to deliver “kando” experiences through sound and music… I like that”

- LIVE NATION

You're in the middle of recording a new album. What's your process and how important is it to give your fans your best?

JESSE MCCARTNEY

Well, one of the things is, you know, fans can like smell B.S. from a mile away. And they know what's authentic to you—they know when you're trying, and they know when you're not. One of the, the most common things I get from my fans is if I go a few days without posting something, they're like, “You're disappearing, you're leaving, you're doing it again. Don't do that.” They definitely keep me on my toes, and I love that. I appreciate that.

And just as an artist and as a perfectionist to somebody who cares about what I'm putting, I want it to be a great quality product. I want it to sound incredible. I want it to be the best calibre writing that I'm capable of. I want it to evoke pain or excitement or romance. I want it to have an impact on my audience, whatever the emotion is. I just want it to translate as something that they can relate to. I think that's the biggest thing in music, so I try to do that at the highest level. I mean, that's part of what this is. I'm not trying to phone it in. I'm trying to do it a hundred percent.

- LIVE NATION

This current flurry of work you're doing with music, I read that it all started because of the fan reaction to “Better With You,” the single you put out early last year, kind of floating it out there, not knowing...

JESSE MCCARTNEY

Yeah, like “Here I am.” Really, “Better With You” was the catalyst for this whole project. And it was something that I was just kind of floating out, like you said—going to see how it does. I knew I wanted to make a video with a concept that I had in mind. And it was more just like expensive content, that’s what I thought it was going to be. Just like, oh, a really nice song with really great visual, and we'll just see what happens, you know? And I wasn't really prepared for the reaction. And now, to be honest, I’m struggling to finish writing, 'cause I've been travelling and touring so much, which is amazing.

But I only had a few songs written, so now I'm trying to finish the project. And it's a great place to be. But yeah, going into this, I didn't think I was going to be writing a full album, and here I am. I'm a few songs away still, but I'm hoping to finish something this year.

- LIVE NATION

Can you talk a little bit more about your relationship with your fans, and the ways you like to keep in touch with them?

JESSE MCCARTNEY

It’s only gotten stronger, particularly in the last three or four years. Social media has such a stronghold in music. It used to be, you know, in the days of “Beautiful Soul,” when I first came out with my debut album, you would have a team of people around you, a PR team, a marketing team, and they would tell you, okay, we're going to do this. And then we're going to go fly to here. And you're going to do this interview. Those things are still important, but the biggest left turn we took was social media.

Now I don't really need to do [many of] the things that you had to do when I signed to a record company 10, 15 years ago. Now I can literally pick up my phone, Instagram or Tweet 20 seconds of a song that I'm working on and get an immediate reaction. And I read the reactions. I go through my direct messages for an hour a day, answer my fans, see what they're up to. Maybe it's even a personal thing that they're going through, or they didn't like the way something was done, and I'll talk to them about it. Like, well, what didn't you like? You have this conversation happening now.

And they have direct access to you, which people didn't [used to] have. It used to be there was mystique to an artist—you would stand behind the curtain. They never saw what was behind the curtain, you know? And then you'd jump out in front, and you would perform, do your thing. Now it's completely been flipped on its head. We live in a world where it's all about content, and it's about 25 percent music and 75 percent what you ate for lunch, you know? And I think that has changed everything in terms of the artist/fan relationship. I mean, it's about content and letting people get a glimpse of your everyday life and get to actually know you.

- LIVE NATION

When your last album, 'In Technicolor', came out listeners said it represented "a more mature sound" for you. You've talked about how "getting it right" can mean going back and forth between exploring new sounds and embracing your early work. What does that mean to you today, and with the music you're currently making?

JESSE MCCARTNEY

Getting it right. To me, it depends on what you're going for. I mean, I think In Technicolor got it right. I was a little bit younger, but I was really trying to attack a sound with that album. I was going for this sort of like, late '70s early '80s pop sound, and we were really homing in on that era of music. It was a tip of the hat to pop of that time.

But even on [my current] project, there's something that can happen in the studio where everyone just looks around and says like, yeah, this feels good. This feels really good. I'm my own harshest critic; I'll pull something apart for months before I'm ready to put it out. And I have a team of people around me too—people with musical minds and ears I can trust. So it's hard to say [when you’ve got it right], and it’s not really a great answer, but you just kind of know. You just feel it.

And by the way, sometimes you just know, and then you get it all wrong. So, you don't ever actually know. And that's sort of the beauty of it. You think, you hope. And then you get on stage and people are like, “Nah, next,” right? So, you go back to the drawing board. But sometimes you write something and you're like, this is pretty good, and it takes on a whole [life] of its own live, with a new arrangement or a remix, or something happens where it just ends up where everyone is like, yeah, this is it.

 I think as a musician and as a songwriter, you go for the best that you can, and you do the best that you know how to do. And whatever happens from there is up to your audience.

- LIVE NATION

You are a producer, as well as singer and songwriter. How much of a challenge is compartmentalizing these different disciplines?

JESSE MCCARTNEY

I rarely record a vocal the same day as I've written a song, because I like the song to sort of breathe and live, and sort of iron itself out—particularly with the melodies. I think that the longer you live with a song, the more it becomes your own, and then the more you can perform it, the better you can perform it. I think that's major, melodically.

But yeah, when I get in the booth I just go into vocal production mode where I know what I can do. After being in the studio for so many years and working with some of the best producers—vocal producers—in the world, I've seen the tricks of the trade and how things can be done to sort of elevate a particular line, or, you know, bring down a certain part of a song. Using my voice is something that specifically I feel like I've gotten really great at over the years.

And then as a producer, yeah, you step into production shoes. You decide what the track [does and] doesn't need. I've gotten into the habit of pulling stuff away from the track, and just giving everything the bare minimum what you need to make a song as great as it can be.

So, you step into different shoes every day, and it takes a long time to get it right. But that's what I love to do.

- LIVE NATION

As a producer, can you tell us a little bit about how important the sound of a track or the sound of a record is to making an emotional connection with your audience?

JESSE MCCARTNEY

Some of my favourite records of all time are the ones where there are little sound effects, little vocal things, like Michael Jackson used to do, right? I grew up on a daily diet of Thriller and all of MJ's records. And to me, it was just the little things that you heard just in the middle of the track that had nothing to do with the chords necessarily or the melodies.

There's just like these little things that would strike you, or this little like, “tah-tah” that Prince would do on the guitar that would literally just be one little thing on the guitar. And somehow it would become like the focus of the record.

Finding those moments, as a producer, I think is what you strive for. What are the little elements that are going to really catch your audience's ear? I think I've done that more than ever with the new songs that I'm putting out now. I think “Selfless” has that. I think “Soul” has that. “Better With You,” you know, it was a simple guitar riff, but the way we put the delay and reverb on it made it one of the most memorable parts of the song.

Sound is one of the most important things when you're experiencing a song, especially for the first time. You want people to want to hear it again and again.

Sony's vision, their core philosophy as a company, is to deliver “kando” experiences through sound and music. “Kando” is a Japanese term that refers to the power of emotional connection or being moved or stirred emotionally.

I like that.

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“I'm in the rare position where I get to be on the other side of it, on stage. It's magnetic.”

- LIVE NATION

Sony’s goal is to deliver emotional connection through sound and music. Can you think of a time when you experienced that yourself through music, when you were moved particularly by a song?

JESSE MCCARTNEY

Some of my fondest memories came at the age of like 4 or 5, sitting in the backseat of my father's car driving up through Connecticut with the leaves changing, driving to my grandmother's house—she lived in the middle of nowhere on this lake. And we would listen to James Taylor's “Sweet Baby James,” and I remember just falling in love with the melody. It was just the prettiest—it would put me to sleep, but it would also cheer me up. It did all of the things that you'd want a song to do, which in a way would be kando, right?

That album did it for me. I was just a kid thinking, man, music is the most magical thing on the planet, and I don't really think I can do anything else after listening to an album like that. I would play it on repeat. I still play it on repeat—in my favourites in my car right now. [Laughs] So I think that was probably the first time I experienced I guess what the Japanese call kando. I love that. I'm going to start using that all the time.

- LIVE NATION

Have you seen your fans react to your music in that way? Have you had interactions with your fans where you could tell that they were emotionally stirred by what you do?

JESSE MCCARTNEY

Yes, and I think most recently it was with the release of “Better With You.” After being away from music for so long I don't think [my fans] were expecting me to put anything out. And “Better With You” just had this sort of nostalgic quality in that it was very reminiscent sonically of my early days, like “Beautiful Soul.” I think it had more of a mature sound, but there was still something about it that tickled the nostalgia bone. It started getting millions of streams and views on YouTube, and it sort of like stirred the pot again. It was an emotional reaction to a song from an artist that maybe they didn't know they wanted to hear from again. It was definitely nice for me to see [such an] overwhelmingly positive reaction.

- LIVE NATION

When you play that live now, do you see that emotional response from the crowd?

JESSE MCCARTNEY

Yeah, it just has this bigness to it. Everybody puts their phones up with their flashlights, waving them in the air. It's become this real sort of anthemic reaction to this mid-tempo power ballad. And it's really one of the best feelings being on stage and seeing the audience react that way to such a new song. The reaction is as big if not bigger than some of the hits I've had on the charts. It's pretty cool.

- LIVE NATION

It must be amazing to hear big audiences sing your lyrics back to you. Can you describe a little bit what that sounds like, and how it hits you emotionally?

JESSE MCCARTNEY

As a show-goer myself, as a fan of music, there’s something about when you hear those first few chords of a song you know and love that brings you immediately to a place in your life, whenever that time was, however old you were. It just triggers so many memories all at once, and you just want to sing along. And I'm in the rare position where I get to be on the other side of it, on stage.

It's magnetic. I mean when you have that moment where you know it's coming, you know you're about to start this song, you look at everybody and there's this dead silence before those chords start. And then they start, and the whole audience just erupts. Everyone is together in that moment thinking like, “oh, you were there, too. You remember this, you were there for this. Oh my God, let's sing this together.” In that moment, you're on the same wavelength. It's a really cool feeling.

- LIVE NATION

Being at the show is one thing, but hearing your music recorded and played back is another. How important is it to you that your fans hear your recorded music in the best way possible?

JESSE MCCARTNEY

I think one of the things we strive to do as artists is to turn out a really great product, and make it sound as clean as possible. I mean, as somebody who's listened to enough records over the years, you know when something sounds a hundred percent. Or when something is sounding a little muddy, or you need to bring this up, or this part is sticking out too much, it's distracting from what's going on in the lyric.
And when it comes together, when it's mixed perfectly, and when you're experiencing the song and everything is perfect, that's like bliss. That's like the ultimate achievement, when you put together a record that sounds near perfect.

It's incredibly important to me that my fans have the same experience as I do when I'm listening back to a mix. I mean, I'm mixing it for them! I want them to hear it at its best, [because] they're the reason I'm making the music. You know, look, if you're a baker you're not going to like bake a loaf of bread halfway and then sell it to somebody. You're going to want it to be perfect. I don't know why I thought of that as an analogy, but it's true.

- LIVE NATION

So much music is consumed in headphones now. Sony's 360 Reality Audio is an immersive audio technology that brings a whole sphere of sound into regular headphones. Does having that ability to really immerse your listener in your music sound like something you'd want to explore?

JESSE MCCARTNEY

I can’t wait to experience it. I haven’t yet heard what it sounds like. But I imagine it's going to be next level. And, you know, anything that advances the experience of listening to music, sign me up.

- LIVE NATION

I’ve read a phrase you use sometimes, “Say yes to great ideas.” It sounds like you're open to new technologies and new ways of doing things.

JESSE MCCARTNEY

One hundred percent. If it elevates the art, if it makes the experience of music more enjoyable for the listener, how could anybody be opposed to something like that?

- LIVE NATION

When you’re recording, what can the right sound at the right time do for a song?

JESSE MCCARTNEY

When you're producing a song, when you're putting something together, sometimes it takes like that one extra thing to tip it over the edge. Sometimes it's a vocal, sometimes it's a drum pattern, sometimes it's a sound effect. You never know what it's going to be. But that one thing could be the difference between [making] a super catchy song that people remember for years to come or not. I think everyone who’s making music is trying to find that thing, especially in pop music.

We're always looking for that, like what's that ear candy? What's that something that's going to bring it to the next level? That's part of what being in the studio is about. It's just searching and investigating new sounds, trying weird stuff, and failing many, many times over. And then hoping that you have that one moment where everyone is like, “Yeah, yeah that's it. You hear that? That's it!”

I did this vocal recently where we sped the vocal up, and it took on this like real chipmunky-sounding quality. And we chopped it up in a million different ways, then reversed it and ran it through a Vocoder or ran it through a synth—we did some weird stuff to it. And then we ended up using it once or twice in the song. But it's a part that people look forward to now. So yeah, it's ear candy. That's the best way to put it—little moments where you're like, “Hey, what’s that?” I like that. I like the way that feels when I hear it.

- LIVE NATION

That description gives us an idea of how complicated it can get in the studio for just one great sound.

JESSE MCCARTNEY

For one moment, totally.

- LIVE NATION

Now back to mixing: Can you describe what the right mix can do for a listener when they experience the song?

JESSE MCCARTNEY

The biggest thing about experiencing a great mix, for me, is when you hear it, nothing stands out. Nothing gets in the way of the song. Nothing is distracting. I feel like I've tuned my ears over the years, so maybe I'm more sensitive than your average listener, but I listen, you know, over and over. And I listen to just the drums, just the high hat. I listen to just the vocal or just the backgrounds. And I look for anything that's like popping out, and then I turn the song really, really low and listen at a very low volume. And again, is there anything like popping out?

Oh, the bass is way too high. We need to bring that down a couple dBs, like pop that down a little bit. Or you know what, this vocal isn’t cutting through enough. We need to bring it up. As a singer, I like vocal up in the mix. I don't know, maybe I'm just really narcissistic, but that's just me. [Laughs] But to me you don't want anything to be distracting you from the song. And there are very few mixers out there who I think are great at it. But when you get a good one, it's the best. It's something I know I would have to spend years and years to get right, so I hand it off to the pros once I finish a song.

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“I've never put on headphones and listened to anything like that before”

- LIVE NATION

[After 360RA demo] So you just now heard a few songs from one of your recent shows mixed in Sony 360 Reality Audio. What was your impression of it?

JESSE MCCARTNEY

I don't know what kind of audio witchcraft you guys have going on back there. But that's like some new stuff I've never heard before. I'm thoroughly impressed. It felt as though my song was sort of like the soundtrack of some blockbuster movie. It just felt bigger than life. I've never put on headphones and listened to anything like that before.

- LIVE NATION

Did it feel like you were at the show?

JESSE MCCARTNEY

It did. It felt like there was a live version of me right in front of me. It also felt like there were a million other people in the audience experiencing this show with me—especially when I would close my eyes. It was just like this full immersive sensation where you feel like you’re watching a live performance. I was blown away.

- LIVE NATION

We were watching you listen to 'Soul' and you were rocking out to it - obviously it was working for you?

JESSE MCCARTNEY

It was. At first, I was just sort of trying to like identify the experience, because it’s like nothing I've ever felt, nothing I've ever heard before. So, at first, I was like, “What is this? What's going on?” And then it felt as though—have you ever been in a Haunted House at Disneyworld and you're in a chair and you're like, “What's that sound?” Things would just appear out of nowhere in the back, and then in the front. It really was just unlike anything I've ever heard. It's just something you have to experience to understand.

- LIVE NATION

Did you have a favorite moment from the 360 Reality Audio mix of “Soul”?

JESSE MCCARTNEY

Yeah. [During] the pre-chorus, you can hear my guitar player, Jacob, who does like these little swells. And these swells would travel from the front to the back, almost like from the front left all the way to the like back right. It was really something you don't get with the typical headphone experience. And it was super cool.

- LIVE NATION

How excited are you for your fans to be able to experience 360 Reality Audio?

JESSE MCCARTNEY

I'm super excited. I think if my fans knew this, by seeing my reaction to this, I can't imagine they won't want to have the same experience. This is something everyone should have, really. I don't see how anyone could not want to experience what I just experienced. Listen, it's going to be hard to go back to my normal cans at this point. [Laughs]

- LIVE NATION

How would you describe Sony 360 Reality Audio in one word?

JESSE MCCARTNEY

Hmmm. “Audiogasmic.” I don't think that's a word—I just made it up.

- LIVE NATION

It is now.

JESSE MCCARTNEY

Yeah.

- LIVE NATION

Can you imagine 360 Reality Audio affecting how you create new music in the future?

JESSE MCCARTNEY

It's an interesting question. Mixers now will probably have to adapt to this technology. Yeah, if I could make music right out of the studio sound like this, I absolutely would. Knowing that this exists, it definitely makes me want to explore sonic moments where this technology could just elevate a track. It's going to be interesting going forward.

- LIVE NATION

Could knowing about 360 Reality Audio maybe spark your interest in making a new live album?

JESSE MCCARTNEY

Absolutely. The last time I did a live album was over a decade ago. And honestly, I wasn't too thrilled with it. I actually remember thinking like, ah, you can mix it all you want, but there's just stuff you can't control—it’s live, you know, it's hard to mix. But when I hear this, it's like I’ve got to finish my album just so we can do the live version. [Laughs]

- LIVE NATION

What do you think your fans would appreciate about your music presented in this format?

JESSE MCCARTNEY

I think that they would hear the time and effort that goes into everything, if [they could] finally hear everything crystal clear, everything in a track. Sometimes things get buried that you never get to hear, just because they haven't been highlighted, they haven't been accentuated properly. With this new tech, if you could pull all of those amazing things out that we've put into it, I think it would elevate the experience tenfold.

- LIVE NATION

What's your impression of Sony measuring your ears in order to optimize 360 Reality Audio for you and give you the best possible listening experience?

JESSE MCCARTNEY

You know, I've had in-ear moulds done for live performance, many times over the years. As a musician, you try to save your ears—you want the right amount of sound, and the right quality of sound going into your ears. Everybody hears music differently. Everyone has certain frequencies they pick up better than others. And if Sony can make the experience unique to your ears and what your eardrums need, it's a wrap—it's an absolute wrap.

- LIVE NATION

What sorts of things would you like to see Sony do next, that are maybe on your wish list?

JESSE MCCARTNEY

Oh my goodness. I mean it sounds like we're going to be playing music on the moon with Sony very soon. I don't know, can you just send me a pair of those headphones in every colour? 'Cause that'd be a start. We'll start with that.

- LIVE NATION

Any final thoughts on 360 Reality Audio?

JESSE MCCARTNEY

If you can give people an amazing product like this, where you're experiencing sound from every different part of your brain—I mean it really sort of plays tricks on your brain in the best possible way—I think it's going to change everything. I think it's going to change everything.

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360 Reality Audio

Discover more about 360 Reality Audio and the technology behind this innovative audio concept.

WH-1000XM3-headphones

Listen with our WH-1000XM3 noise-cancelling headphones for the full 360 Reality Audio experience.