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4K 3D Sony technology powering advances in microsurgery
ORBEYE

Sony's logo is shown on a black background.

Background music plays.

On-screen text, "Note: Footage of surgery in this video may make some viewers uncomfortable." appears on the upper right corner of the screen.
In a room, there is a table of some men in jackets or shirts.
On the table, there are many black miniature models.
Those are a monitor, some machines, some human figure standing, and some human figure sitting.
The men talks while moving those models.

Shiori Tomita narrates.

Narration
"There is one area that has seen little in the way of groundbreaking innovation over the past 60 years: microsurgery."

In an operation room.
A male surgeon in light blue surgical clothing moves his hand, looking into the eyepiece of a large surgical microscope.
A female surgeon in blue surgical clothing holds the grips on a microscope and looks into its eyepiece.
A male surgeon wearing glasses sits in front of a microscope and looks into its eyepiece.
A surgeon wearing light blue surgical clothing looks into an eyepiece of a large surgical microscope and performs surgery with his both hands.
Next to the surgeon, a surgical assistant aligns some instruments.

Narration
"Microsurgery demands the highest level of skill from surgeons.
Yet they must deal with a tiny field of view, an uncomfortable surgical posture, and a constricting environment for hour after hour during an operation.
These challenges have stood in the way of saving even more lives."

In a room.
The back of a man in front of a monitor.
He touches the switch on a microscope tube installed at the end of a flexible arm.
There is an objective lens on the end of the microscope tube.
Below the microscope tube, there is a human head model. Its brain is exposed.
On the background of the image of a man wearing 3D glasses looking at the monitor while touching the microscope tube, the opening title, "Sony's Innovations & Challenges" and "Stories" are displayed.

In a dark room.
Three men in jackets or shirts.
One of the men explains about a machine by pointing its illustration projected on a screen.

On-screen text
Discovering New Potential in Medicine and Surgery

On a white background, a logo, "Sony Olympus Medical Solutions" and its description, "A medical business venture company of Sony and Olympus" are displayed.
Below that, on-screen text, "Sony and Olympus have done what one company could not:
Leveraging their technologies and assets to open a new world." is displayed.

Background music changes.

A surgical microscope system is displayed in a room.
Its white body is compactly designed.
The system has a long flexible arm; on its end, a microscope tube is attached.
The system has four wheels on its bottom so it can be moved easily.
On the lower left corner of its body, a logo, "ORBEYE" is displayed.

The close-up of the objective lens of a surgical microscope.
Two lighting lenses on both sides of the objective lens light up.
A man in light navy surgical clothing, wearing 3-D glasses, talks while washing his hands and arms after an operation.

On-screen text
David Langer, MD
Chair, Department of Neurosurgery
Lenox Hill Hospital

David speaks.

David
"When I'm offered the traditional microscope, I'm the only one seeing the surgical view.
Everybody sees the same view as the surgeon in ORBEYE.
To be able to have other people in the room experience that is very unique.
Your body position, your comfort is better.
You have more magnification, the lighting is more consistent.
I tell people, when I first saw this, you know, when you see the beauty of the brain and blood vessels...
You're like, this is why I have become a neurosurgeon, really. It's beautiful."

In an operation room.
Members of a surgical team wearing 3D glasses and surgical clothing are standing by a wall and facing the same direction with their arms folded.
The surgeon, Dr. David uses the surgical microscope system "ORBEYE" and does an operation while watching a large monitor.
A few assistants are beside him.
The monitor is showing a brain-like thing.
One of the members, who are standing by the wall, adjusts the position of his/her 3D glasses and watches the operation via the monitor.
Dr. David does this operation while sitting. At the same time, he freely moves the position of ORBEYE's microscope tube.
A plastic sheet is covering ORBEYE's arm and the periphery of the microscope tube.
The lighting lenses on the microscope tube light up.
Dr. David and the team are doing the operation.
The two lighting lenses light up. Dr. David does the operation while his face being right close to the microscope tube.
Dr. David does the operation.
On the 3D glasses that Dr. David is wearing, the brain of the patient in operation are reflected.

A photo is shown.
It shows a scene of a doctor doing an operation while looking into the eyepiece of a microscope.
In a room surrounded by frosted glass walls.
A man in a black jacket sits in a sofa and is interviewed.

On-screen text
Masaaki Ueda
Product Planning

Ueda speaks.

Ueda
"Looking through an eyepiece puts a real strain on the surgeon's neck."

Ueda touches the back of his neck.

Ueda
"The surgeon has to maintain the same posture throughout the operation.
There was this desire to eliminate the need for an eyepiece.
So, we took on the challenge of making the microscope digital."

The close-up of the microscope tube installed at the end of ORBEYE's arm.
The whole image of ORBEYE on display is shown.

In a room surrounded by frosted glass walls.
A man wearing glasses and a jacket sits in a sofa and is interviewed.

On-screen text
Junichi Nozawa
Product Development

Nozawa speaks.

Nozawa
"The issue was that optical microscopes offer incredible image quality.
It's very hard to replicate that texture and sense of light with a digital system."

Ueda speaks.

Ueda
"About 5 years ago, the discussion began about cooperating with Sony.
We thought we could make it happen with Sony's 4K technology."

A 4K photo taken by a Sony α9 camera.
It is a natural scene covered with snow.
The icicles and moss-like shapes of the snow are shown clearly up to details.
Another 4K photo taken by a Sony α7RⅢ camera.
It is a view of mountain ranges.
Spots of snow on the side of the farthest mountain can be recognized.
Pale pink clouds are wafting along in the light blue sky.
The photo even captures the mist on the surface of a lake.

The scene changes to another image.
In an operation room.
A surgeon in surgical clothing reaches his/her gloved hands to a microscope tube and changes its position.
A plastic sheet is covering the periphery of the microscope tube.
The surgeon does an operation in front of the microscope tube.

In a room surrounded by frosted glass walls.
A man in a jacket sits in a sofa and is interviewed.

On-screen text
Hidenori Taguchi
Product Planning

Taguchi speaks

Taguchi
"Sony's 4K 3D technology truly amazed us.
We could even see the red blood cells flowing through the blood vessels on the surface of the brain."

The scene changes to another image.
In an operation room.
A surgeon in surgical clothing raises his/her gloved hand in front of his/her chest.
An assistant is helping the surgeon to wear 3D glasses.

Nozawa speaks.

Nozawa
"Now everyone could see the same thing on the monitor.
Assistant surgeons and other surgical staff suddenly had access to this amazing world for the first time."

An image that ORBEYE's objective lens captures is shown on a monitor.
An image of a human-tissue-like thing is clearly shown on the monitor.

Ueda speaks.

Ueda
"Since everyone sees the same image as the surgeon, it becomes true team surgery.
Being able to do surgery as a team has the potential to take efficiency to the next level."

An image of a scalpel cutting into the human-tissue-like thing is shown on the monitor.
The microscope tube is moved and another section is shown.

Ueda
"At the same time, we needed to take compactness to the limit.
By leveraging Sony's digital imaging technologies, we were able to minimize the size of the optical system.
This let us reduce the total volume of the microscope by 95%."

In a room.
On a screen, an illustration that explains ORBEYE is projected.
Nozawa, Taguchi, and others are discussing.
A man rotates and adjusts ORBEYE's microscope tube.
An illustration comparing the size of ORBEYE with a conventional microscope.
It shows that ORBEYE has a simple design and significantly reduced size compared with the conventional microscope.
Explanation saying "Microscope compactness" and "95% size reduction" is on the screen.

In a room surrounded by frosted glass walls.
A man in a gray shirt sits in a sofa and is interviewed.

On-screen text
Koji Fukaya
Product Development

Fukaya speaks.

Fukaya
"We used a CMOS sensor to move to a video format.
The result was a vast reduction in microscope size."

An image that illustrates how ORBEYE works.
First, each of the left and right images of the object passes through an "Objective lens", and two "Zoom lenses" and one "Imaging lens" which are placed for left and right respectively. Then, it is captured on each "CMOS sensor" and converted into electrical signal for "image processing" respectively.
Finally, the captured images are shown on a large monitor in 3D.
Thus, people can see internal organs through a monitor, instead of looking into an eyepiece of conventional surgical microscope.

Ueda speaks.

Ueda
"Making a microscope tube extremely compact led to making the whole body of the microscope extremely compact."

An illustration comparing the size of ORBEYE with a conventional model of a whole microscope system.
It shows that the ORBEYE's arm and microscope tube has a simple design and reduced size compared with the conventional microscope. The size of ORBEYE's system part lower than the arm part is approximately halved.

Ueda
"That means it's very easy to position the microscope during surgery, move it where it's needed, and put it to one side when not in use.
A hospital can use a single unit in a wide range of specialties.
Everyone tells us this microscope is extremely versatile.
They are giving it very positive evaluations."

An image showing the mobility of ORBEYE.
A woman in surgical clothing holds the handle of ORBEYE and moves it smoothly.
Another woman packs the arm part with a plastic sheet.
An image of ORBEYE's arm.
The arm has a microscope tube on its end moves flexible.

Fukaya speaks.

Fukaya
"I think that Sony still has an incredibly large number of technologies to be leveraged.
We can deliver in many ways yet to be discovered and develop a wide range of new products."

Fukaya is talking in front of black miniature models of machines and human figures, which are arranged like an operation room.
Taguchi, holding a circuit board in his hands, talks with Fukaya.

Ueda speaks.

Ueda
"We want to offer doctors the best possible equipment and environment.
We think doing so helps surgeons become true experts in a shorter period."

Nozawa, Taguchi, and Fukaya move the black miniature models of machines and human figures on the table over and over as they talk.

Nozawa speaks.

Nozawa
"I think that we've only taken the very first step by making a surgical microscope capable of video.
We've made the microscope easier to use, but now we need to see how surgeons' skills and results will improve over time.
It's only then that we will have contributed to medicine.
So that's why I personally feel that we are only halfway through this new revolution."

Fukaya wearing 3D glasses moves ORBEYE's microscope tube.
Below the microscope tube, there is a human head model exposing about half of its brain.
The monitor is showing a human-tissue-like thing.
As Fukaya's hand moves the microscope tube, the monitor gradually shows a closer view of the human-tissue-like thing.
Taguchi puts a paper document on a desk.
There are many paper documents with illustrations and pictures on the desk.
On a whiteboard, an illustration that shows the whole image of ORBEYE and other illustrations and photos that explain each part of ORBEYE are shown.
On a table, black miniature models of machines and human figures are arranged like an operation room.
In front of the whiteboard, Fukaya, Nozawa, and Taguchi talk using gestures and move the models.

Nozawa operates ORBEYE's microscope tube above a human head model.
An objective lens on the end of the microscope tube.
Two lighting lenses on both sides of the objective lens light up.
A built-in touch panel on top of ORBEYE's body.
It shows many numerical values.
ORBEYE's arm extended from its body.
Fukaya, wearing 3D glasses, operates ORBEYE's microscope tube at the end of its arm and shows a human head model on a monitor.

Narration
"Sony's technologies can't directly save people's lives.
But they support the people who do, helping them realize new breakthroughs.
Sony's journey into new frontiers of medicine has only just begun."
On-screen text
Sony's innovation in medicine has only just begun.

Movie ends with Sony's logo.